Almost two in five Irish people are leaving themselves open to a likely data breach by not updating their passwords often enough, a new poll of 1,000 adults claims. STOCK IMAGE
Almost two in five Irish people are leaving themselves open to a likely data breach by not updating their passwords often enough, a new poll of 1,000 adults claims. STOCK IMAGE

Adrian Weckler

Almost two in five Irish people are leaving themselves open to a likely data breach by not updating their passwords often enough, a new poll of 1,000 adults claims.

The YouGov research, commissioned by the global security access firm OneLogin to mark the setting up of an Irish office, shows that 39pc of us haven’t updated passwords in a year. It also claims that one in five Irish adults haven’t updated their passwords in over two years.

A quick search on the website haveibeenpwned.com should be enough to warn Irish people who fall into this category. The website, which shows you if your email address has fallen prey to online hackers at some point, may make grim perusal for almost half of Irish internet users on the evidence of the OneLogin survey.

The OneLogin/YouGov research also claims that over a quarter of Irish adults write their password down on a piece of paper, with almost as many storing passwords on their phone or computer. Only 16pc use a password manager such as LastPass, Google Password or OneLogin.

One factor in understanding the lack of security hygiene over passwords in Ireland may be a professed level of annoyance that Irish people say they feel at online security measures.

Almost a third of us get frustrated by the familiar Captcha random image and number generator system, while nearly one in five get irked by one-time passcodes via text or email.

According to OneLogin, the global cost of cybercrime was estimated to be in excess of €500bn in 2017, with this figure “expected to continue to grow into the future”.

CyberSecurity Ireland says over €200bn will be invested in cybersecurity each year by 2023.

The password research comes as OneLogin announced a new Dublin office with the promised creation of 30 jobs.

OneLogin lets organisations give employees to access to apps and data securely.

Its new Dublin office, led by Elle Lathrop, is being set up to support sales, engineering and customer services across the EMEA region.

OneLogin has offices in the US, UK, Netherlands, Germany, Mexico, Australia and Japan. It’s corporate customers include Tesco, Fairfax Media, NTT Data, Fujitsu Social Science Laboratory and the British Red Cross.

“Ireland is fast establishing itself as a strategic technology innovation hub and one with an incredible pool of talent,” said Brad Brooks, CEO of OneLogin.

“We see the office opening in Dublin as an important move in the growth plans for OneLogin’s global business. With the Irish market booming and major names moving into the market, we’re excited to be able to offer our solution at a time when every enterprise needs to securely and efficiently protect their business applications, employee and customer identities.”

Online Editors





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